1.   Gum health better in Roman times than in people today

    Gum health better in Roman times than in people today

    Scientists from Kings College London and the Natural History Museum studied 303 skulls dated, from between, AD 200 and AD 400 and found that only 5% had gum disease.
  2. Virus attack killing Spanish amphibians and threatening reptiles

    Virus attack killing Spanish amphibians and threatening reptiles

    Amphibian populations across Spain are being killed by two deadly ranaviruses viruses.
  3. Garlic used to treat tree disease

    Garlic used to treat tree disease

    A preliminary trial has taken place using concentrated garlic injections to treat tree diseases like bleeding canker of horse chestnut and oak trees with acute oak decline.
  4. Microbiology project wins Google Science Fair prize

    Microbiology project wins Google Science Fair prize

    Three teenagers from Ireland have won the Grand Prize at the Google Science Fair for their project looking at using bacteria to reduce world food shortages.

 

  1. Winter Meeting

    Royal Society, Carlton House Terrace, London

    14 January 2015

  2. Spring Meeting

    Sheffield Hilton

    16 April 2015

  3. Summer Conference

    Four Seasons Hotel Dublin, Ireland

    29 June - 2 July 2015

Journals
  1. Journal highlight - sustainable production of organic acids via SynBio

    Journal highlight - sustainable production of organic acids via SynBio

    A review summarizing the latest research on SynBio approaches to engineer C.?glutamicum for the bio-based production of organic acids.

 


Schools & Public Engagement

Have a look at the videos below to see some examples of schools and public engagement work supported by SfAM:

"The Hawaiian bobtail squid - when science and nature collide" is an animation about the bioluminescent marine microbe Vibrio fischeri and was funded by SfAM's Public Engagement Grant.



The World of Microbiology project *

* This work was established using funding from the Wellcome Trust. SfAM continued the funding from July 2011.

See more about schools and public engagement here.

About SfAM

The Society for Applied Microbiology (SfAM) is the voice of applied microbiology and oldest microbiology society in the UK. Its object is to advance for the benefit of the public the science of microbiology in its application to the environment, human and animal health, agriculture and industry. 

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Microbiologist

For more information, including editorial and advertising submissions, click here

 

 

Twitter

 
  1. sfamtweets: Research Councils UK highlights initiatives to tackle antimicrobial resistance | Microbe Post http://t.co/EK7ZPMJdax

    2:32 PM Oct 24

  2. sfamtweets: Cement made from bacteria & waste much greener than traditional recipes. Wonder if material properties are equiv? http://t.co/tQOkISio2o

    11:10 PM Oct 20

  3. sfamtweets: RT @Stewart_Barker "My paper on temocillin in orthopaedic cement has been published with @BSACandJAC! Thanks to @SfAMtweets for funding....

    5:55 PM Oct 20