1. Turkey eggs may provide clue to new antimicrobial coatings

    Turkey eggs may provide clue to new antimicrobial coatings

    Australian Brush Turkeys incubate their eggs in rotting vegetation yet only 9% of eggs become infected. Researchers from the University of Akron studied the eggs to discover how they resisted becoming infected by microbes.
  2. White blood cells as vaccines

    White blood cells as vaccines

    Researchers have used white blood cells as the basis of a vaccine against cytomegalovirus, a leading cause of birth defects.
  3. A-tish-oo, a-tish-oo, we all fall down: zoonotic influenza

    A-tish-oo, a-tish-oo, we all fall down: zoonotic influenza

    Influenza viruses have been some of the most high profile pathogens to transmit from animals to humans. But how do they make that leap?
  4. Activated Sludge: A century of controlling waterborne disease

    Activated Sludge: A century of controlling waterborne disease

    Mike Dempsey discusses the history of Activated Sludge, which has been key to controlling waterborne disease for a century.

 

  1. Spring Meeting

    30 April 2014

  2. Science Communication and Public Engagement Workshop

    The Physiological Society, Hodgkin Huxley House, 30 Farringdon Lane, London EC1R 3AW

    19 June 2014

  3. Summer Conference

    The Grand, Brighton

    30 June - 3 July 2014

  4. Winter Meeting

    Royal Society, Carlton House Terrace, London

    14 January 2015

Journals
  1. Journal highlight - multifactorial regulation of gene expression in E.coli

    Journal highlight - multifactorial regulation of gene expression in E.coli

    sigmaS, a major player in the response to environmental stresses in Escherichia coli: role, regulation and mechanisms of promoter recognition.

 


Schools & Public Engagement

Have a look at the videos below to see some examples of schools and public engagement work supported by SfAM:

"The Hawaiian bobtail squid - when science and nature collide" is an animation about the bioluminescent marine microbe Vibrio fischeri and was funded by SfAM's Public Engagement Grant.



The World of Microbiology project *

* This work was established using funding from the Wellcome Trust. SfAM continued the funding from July 2011.

See more about schools and public engagement here.

About SfAM

The Society for Applied Microbiology (SfAM) is the voice of applied microbiology and oldest microbiology society in the UK. Its object is to advance for the benefit of the public the science of microbiology in its application to the environment, human and animal health, agriculture and industry. 

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Twitter

 
  1. sfamtweets: Multifactorial regulation of gene expression in E.coli - Journal news http://t.co/cYgtrnALdl

    9:15 AM Apr 23

  2. sfamtweets: A plague in your family - independent evolution of Black Death bacterium's harmful relatives http://t.co/eaXpdpZ6Mu

    5:55 PM Apr 22

  3. sfamtweets: Turkey eggs may provide clue to new antimicrobial coatings http://t.co/qOoMU5k4oZ

    3:02 PM Apr 22