1. White blood cells as vaccines

    White blood cells as vaccines

    Researchers have used white blood cells as the basis of a vaccine against cytomegalovirus, a leading cause of birth defects.
  2. A-tish-oo, a-tish-oo, we all fall down: zoonotic influenza

    A-tish-oo, a-tish-oo, we all fall down: zoonotic influenza

    Influenza viruses have been some of the most high profile pathogens to transmit from animals to humans. But how do they make that leap?
  3. Activated Sludge: A century of controlling waterborne disease

    Activated Sludge: A century of controlling waterborne disease

    Mike Dempsey discusses the history of Activated Sludge, which has been key to controlling waterborne disease for a century.
  4. First synthetic yeast chromosome heralds new industrial revolution

    First synthetic yeast chromosome heralds new industrial revolution

    Yeast cells containing a synthetic chromosome grow well, opening the door to new methods of making medicines, vaccines, biofuels, and more.

 

  1. Spring Meeting

    30 April 2014

  2. Summer Conference

    The Grand, Brighton

    30 June - 3 July 2014

  3. Winter Meeting

    Royal Society, Carlton House Terrace, London

    14 January 2015

Journals
  1. Journal highlight - life after death for biofilms

    Journal highlight - life after death for biofilms

    A potential strategy for dealing with harmful biofilms has arisen, thanks to the discovery of a critical role for extracellular DNA in maintaining biofilm structure.

 


Schools & Public Engagement

Have a look at the videos below to see some examples of schools and public engagement work supported by SfAM:

"The Hawaiian bobtail squid - when science and nature collide" is an animation about the bioluminescent marine microbe Vibrio fischeri and was funded by SfAM's Public Engagement Grant.



The World of Microbiology project *

* This work was established using funding from the Wellcome Trust. SfAM continued the funding from July 2011.

See more about schools and public engagement here.

About SfAM

The Society for Applied Microbiology (SfAM) is the voice of applied microbiology and oldest microbiology society in the UK. Its object is to advance for the benefit of the public the science of microbiology in its application to the environment, human and animal health, agriculture and industry. 

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  1. sfamtweets: MT @OccultInfection: ID the intracellular bacterial stimulus for non-resolving inflammation which is at the root of many chronic diseases.

    4:03 PM Apr 16

  2. sfamtweets: How could microbiology work in a privatised health system? #Microbiology #SciPolicy #SGMLiv

    2:50 PM Apr 16

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    12:50 PM Apr 16